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iSGTW Link of the Week - Particle physics is the new rock 'n roll

Link of the Week - "Particle physics is the new rock 'n roll"


CERN does have "The Canettes," and Fermilab has an a cappella singing group . . . Image above courtesy of Josiah Norton, sxc.h. Previous image on front page courtesy Gus Cunh, sxc.hu

The extraordinary questions that particle physics hopes to answer has attracted the attention of some high profile, and unusual, fans.

Or so said The BBC, which ran a show saying that "Particle physics is the new rock 'n roll." Among others, they number fans such as Robin Williams, Mick Jagger, Queen guitarist Brian May, (now Dr. Brian May, proud recipient of a PhD in astronomy), magician David Blaine and Madonna.

Alexandra Feachem, the BBC producer behind Big Bang Day - Physics Rocks, said "Particle physics may sound like a topic meant only for . . . those loveable nerdy types who think a fun night out involves an anorak and a thermos of soup. But like any true convert to a greater good, I have seen the light; I know there is no other way. Physics is the be-all and end-all of science. I'm a born-again physicist. And it seems I'm not the only one. Those A-listers are way ahead of me."

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