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iSGTW Link of the week - PSC tornado animation

Link of the week - Children's publication features tornado animation



Simulated Twister
This sequence of frames from an animation, created by PSC visualization specialist Greg Foss, show the simulated tornado as it moves within the grid volume and evolves. (Darkness of gray shading corresponds to water concentration.)
Image courtesy of Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

The online edition of the classic children's publication Weekly Reader recently featured a tornado animation produced at Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

PSC visualization specialist Greg Foss created the animation from a simulation by University of Oklahoma scientist Ming Xue. Xue, director of the Center for the Analysis and Prediction of Storms at Norman, used PSC supercomputing to simulate a 1977 supercell storm system and the high-intensity tornado it spawned. The results-which capture the tornado's vortex structure, with wind speed of 260 miles per hour-represent the highest resolution simulation ever done of an entire thunderstorm and its tornado.

See PSC's article about this work, Retwistered Twister.


About PSC

The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center is a joint effort of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh together with Westinghouse Electric Company. Established in 1986, PSC is supported by several federal agencies, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and private industry, and is a resource provider in the National Science Foundation TeraGrid program.

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